Posts in Culture Stories
Angela Bassett stars in both Panther movies

I watched two Black Panther movies today: “Panther,” the one put out by Mario and Melvin Van Pebbles in 1995 and, in my opinion, prematurely discarded from theaters, and the new one by Marvel, “Black Panther.” Angela Bassett stars in both films and the span of 23 years has not cracked her beautiful Black! if you liked “Black Panther,” I encourage you to revisit “Panther,” which has a lot of strong on-point performances.

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Money changes situations: an interview wit’ financial advisor Kendra Willis

We all love to spend money, but how many of us have learned how to effectivily save for a rainy day, college, a business or retirement? Many of us have spent more time watching TV in our lives than planning for our family’s financial future. Many of us don’t like to talk about these things because we’re embarrassed we don’t know much about financial literacy, investing and saving money properly. Check out financial advisor Kendra Willis in her own words.

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Celebrating Our Black Super-Heroes!

By now, many of you may have had the opportunity to view the brilliant screenwriter-director Ryan Coogler’s film, “Black Panther,” which was produced and distributed by the for-profit European-American owned and operated Marvel and Walt Disney corporations. For the past few weeks, people of differing ages and nationalities have been flashing the cross-armed “‘Wakanda’ Forever” sign. i will not at this time debate the neo-colonialist and imperialistic politics of this technically-stunning visual work.

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Rev. Dr. James A. Forbes Jr., pastor emeritus of historic Riverside Church in New York City, to announce national movement during Good Friday Service at Third Baptist Church

This year’s Good Friday Service at the historic Third Baptist Church of San Francisco will be far from typical, with an acclaimed pastor and civil rights icon from New York City announcing a national movement against poverty and immorality in religion and politics, sponsored by the NAACP, the Episcopal Diocese of New York and Sojourners magazine. Good Friday Service is March 30, noon to 1:30 p.m., at Third Baptist Church of San Francisco, 1399 McAllister St., San Francisco.

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Oakland, you deserve a parade: Black joy to the world

The Black Joy Parade in Oakland, Sunday afternoon, Feb. 25, was a heartwarming and overwhelming success! A great thing that just happened in Oakland that has practically received no media play. But what a day – a history making day! I’ve never seen anything like it in all my days. Initially, I really didn’t know what to expect and yet I had great expectations. The buzz about the event had been good for at least a month.

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Wanda’s Picks for March 2018

I don’t know how Avotcja does it all: host two radio shows, perform with her band Modupue and curate such a phenomenal series of poetry and storytelling events. Yet she does and has for more years than we have fingers and toes. This is why, though I appreciated and loved “Beloved Oakland,” I think two culture workers were left out: Avotcja and Paradise. I would not have excluded any of the awardees; however, to omit Avotcja is like forgetting to bow to the Queen (as in Califa, not Victoria).

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Culture StoriesChanged‘House/Full of Blackwomen: AfroNOW’, ‘Library of Lies’ and ‘Until Until Until …’, “Artist Conversation”, “Beloved Oakland”, “Between Us”, “double consciousness”, “La Palabra Musical, “LAVEAU: A Conjuring of Marie Laveau” by Brit Frazier, “Library of Lies”, “Nevertheless She Persisted: Honoring Women Who Fight All Forms of Discrimina..., “Prussian Blue”, “Radical Hospitality”, “Shifting Spaces”, “The Library of Black Lies”, “They/Them”, “Transitions”, “Until Until Until …”, “Vessels”, “Waafrika 123”, 23rd annual “Collage des Cultures Africaines: Migration Stories: Our Historie..., African American history, African American Shakespeare, African Film Festival, Afropunk, Alexa C- Burell, Amara Tabor-Smith, Amber McZeal, Anita Hill, Annual Healing Evening of Poetry, Anthony Reese, Audre Lourde, Auset Movement volunteers, Avotcja, Avotcja Bay Area treasure, Azubike, BAM/PFA, Barbara Lee and Elihu Harris Lecture Series, Ben Vereen, Bert Williams, Black Culture Zone (BCZ) in East Oakland, Black Media Appreciation Night, Brava and BACCE, Brit Frazier, Careth Reid, Cesar Chavez Library, Charles Peoples III, City College of SF, City of Oakland, Commission on Sexual Harassment and Advancing Equality in the Workplace, Custom Made Theatre in SF, Dezi Soléy, Diamano Coura West African Dance Company, Eastside Arts Alliance, EC Scott, Edgar Arceneaux, Ellen Sebastian Chang, Evening with Michelle Obama at the Oracle, Every Saturday in March Celebrates Women at Joyce Gordon Gallery, Frank Lawson, Freight & Salvage, Gateway Theatre, gentrification, growing up Black in America, Halifu Osumare, Holly Near and Linda Tillery, Interview with Edgar Arceneaux while he was here with ‘Until Until Until …’, Jazz and the Fire of Wordsong, John Fisher, Judge Clarence Thomas, Julian Myers-Szupinska, Kimiko Joy, Kwalin Kimaathi, Laney College, Lisa Marie Rollins, Lise Pearlman, Lubia Sanchez, Lyla Neely, Malaika Kambon, Malonga Casquelourd Center for the Arts, Marcus Gardley’s “Dance of the Holy Ghosts”, Margo Hall, Marie Labossiere, Marines Memorial Theatre in SF, Maya Parades-Hernandez, Michelle Obama, Modupue, Music of the Word”, Nick Hadikwa Mwaluko, Nick Hadikwa Mwaluko’s ‘They/Them’, Oakland City Councilwoman Lynette Gibson McElhaney, Octavia Butler, Oracle, Paradise, Peralta College Community radio personality Flo Wiley, Poder de Mujer (Woman Power), Professor Anita Hill headlines Barbara Lee and Elihu Harris Lecture Series, revelations, Rhonda Benin’s “Just Like a Woman”, San Francisco State University’s Black Student Union, San Francisco State University’s School of Ethnic Studies, Saturdays at AAMLO for Women’s History Month, sexual mistreatment and inequality in the entertainment industry, Sister Maryom Anna Al Wadi, Tammy Lynn Hall and The Lillian Armstrong Tribute Band, Tearrance Arvelle Chisholm’s “Hooded or Being Black for Dummies’”, Tennessee Williams’ “A Street Car Named Desire”, Theatre Rhinoceros, TheatreFIRST, Those Women Productions, Tobaji, Toni Cade Bambara, Ubuntu Theatre Company, Wanda Ravernel, Wanda Sabir, Wanda's Picks Radio, Wanda’s Picks for March 2018, Wilfred Batin, Women's History Month, Wood Street in the Lower Bottoms of West Oakland, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Yishai Jusidman Comments
‘Farrakhan’

He was born in 1933. He, of course, is Minister Louis Farrakhan but, like Oprah or Prince, one name is enough to garner recognition. Say “Farrakhan” – and everyone knows of whom you speak. This has especially been so since Oct. 16, 1995, the day his call for the assemblage of a million Black men was met by at least a million Black men. What other Black leader could have done this?

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A loving farewell to Anita Labossiere, champion of environmental justice

Anita Corine Sanderson-Labossiere, beloved mother, caring grandmother, dedicated daughter, loving sister and friend, departed on Thursday, Feb. 22, at the age of 62. She was active as a rank-and-file union member of IFPTE Local 21, as well as in a number of other organizations. Among those, Anita was very passionate about one in particular, the Shafter Avenue Community Club, a community organization dedicated to environmental justice in the Bayview Hunters Point District in San Francisco.

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‘Business in the Black’ is coming to San Francisco

“Business in the Black: The rise of Black business in America, 1800s-1960s” is a documentary. Finally there’s a film that looks at the achievements of African Americans in the arena of business starting with slavery times. This film is special because little is said about the accomplishments of slaves and African Americans in the area of business. "Business in the Black" is showing in San Francisco at Safehouse Arts Center, Saturday, March 10, 7 p.m. reception, film at 7:30 p.m., admission $10, tickets available on Eventbrite.

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Oakland students embark on study abroad in South Africa

Twenty-eight Oakland students from McClymonds, Castlemont, Skyline, Oakland Tech, Emery High and Ile Omode Schools will soon travel to Johannesburg, South Africa, to participate in “The South Africa Project,” a two-week study abroad program. Kharyshi Wiginton, founder of Culture Keepers, works to build cultural awareness through study abroad opportunities for Oakland students. This year will be her third cohort of Oakland students participating in “The South Africa Project.”

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San Francisco’s celebration of Black History Month done right

Congratulations, San Francisco! We did it. We began with our Black History Month Kickoff Reception, which was held at our local CBS-KPIX Main Studios on Jan. 31, where celebrities enjoyed mixing it up with our community. City Hall followed by launching their own impressive venue to celebrate Black History on Feb. 2. It was a huge success because of speakers like London Breed and Malia Cohen. We also rocked the house at our own Southeast Community Center with the celebration of Dr. Espanola Jackson Day.

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Free the land! Commemorating 50 years of the Republic of New Afrika

FREE THE LAND! FREE THE LAND! AFRIKANS! In this Spirit of creating just and prosperous nations, this is the 50th Year Commemoration of the founding of the Republic of New Afrika. On 31 March 1968, over 500 revolutionaries from across the u.s.a. came together in detroit for a “Black Government and Governance Conference,” called by the Malcolm X Society and Group on Advanced Leadership (GOAL).

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Culture StoriesChanged“Black Government and Governance Conference”, “Black Solidarity Week” by the Community Ready Corps for Self-Determination (..., “Sign Me Up for Freedom”, 50th Year Commemoration of the founding of the Republic of New Afrika, African Union, Baba Jahahara Amen-RA Alkebulan-Maat, Bay Area Black/Afrikan Ourstory-Future Month activities, Betty Sanders X Shabazz, Bill Hampton, Black Joy Parade in Oakland, Black Panther Party and its Ten-Point Platform, BPP, civil rights movements and leaders, COINTELPRO, El Hajj Malik el Shabazz, Fred Hampton Sr-, FREE the land!, Free the land! Commemorating 50 years of the Republic of New Afrika, Gaidi Oabadele, Geoffreys Inner Circle, Group on Advanced Leadership (GOAL), Imari Oabadele, independent New Afrikan nation-state, Malcolm X, Malcolm X Society, Matthew "Butch" Brown Jr-, Mona Lisa Bruce, monetary Reparations for New Afrikan people, MOVE, N'COBRA Reparations, National Coalition of Blacks for Reparations in American (N’COBRA), National Conference of Black Lawyers, New Afrikan Constitution, New Afrikan national territory, New Afrikans, Oakland Black Joy Parade, Organization of African Unity, PG-RNA, Provisional Government, Queen Mother Betty Reid Soskin, Republic of New Afrika, Robert and Mabel Robinson Williams, Rosie the Riveter World War II Home Front National Historical Park in Richmond, The Village Project in San Francisco, United Nations, West County Healthy Eating Active Living (HEAL), Willie "da Sweet Man' Paul, Wyatt Walker Comment
A tribe called identity: Finding your Wakanda

African Ancestry, Inc. (AfricanAncestry.com), the pioneers of genetic ancestry tracing for people of African descent, commemorates its 15th year by bringing focus on the importance of African ethnic groups, commonly referred to as tribes. Along with helping people find out where they’re from in Africa, AfricanAncestry.com is the only DNA service that also pinpoints tribes as a part of its results package.

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Black disabled folks have been separated from the Black community since slavery

Slavery ended in the U.S. after the 13th Amendment was ratified on Dec. 6, 1865. However, disabled slaves were kept on plantations because slavery was connected to the ability to work. Jim Downs, among other scholars, wrote an essay entitled, “The Continuation of Slavery: The Experience of Disabled Slaves during Emancipation,” which explains that disabled slaves were seen as non-workers. Because they could not work, they were kept on plantations to be “taking care of.” But in reality, they continued to work for their “masters.”

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Black Panther as neo-Tarzanism

Hollywood films should always come with a consumer health warning to people of African descent: “Beware of ‘The Ideology of the Aesthetic,’ as Terry Eagleton would put it.” With all the hype, “Black Panther: Long Live the King” falls under this manipulative ideological warfare genre and should have been subtitled, “Down With the King,” for subscribing to what Wole Soyinka would dismiss as the pseudo tradition of neo-Tarzanism.

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‘Black Panther’ inspires pride in Africa and being African

The most revolutionary aspect of the film “Black Panther” is the mere fact that it showcases the beauty, history, relevance and capability of being simply Black and proud. I relate this strongly with the stigma many Black Americans have towards Africa, mainly visible in the lack of interest in visiting the vast continent of 54 countries. Moreover, the plague of insecurity that rests in Black people with their appearance and desire to look more European.

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The Parkland Arcane

Guns and money, --- Guns and money. --- This isn’t about --- Dempsey & Tunney. --- It’s about the religion --- of the very unfunny --- United States and the --- 17 dead in Parkland --- at the hands of Santa --- Cross* with that metallic --- white supremacist look, --- Saint Nikolas Cruz, who --- hates Jews, Blacks, and --- announced himself as --- a future school shooter ---even before he pulled --- the trigger, (go figger, --- niggas and kikes), --- it’s all about stukas, --- lugers and dykes;

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Black children have the right to be children

Historically, Black children have been exposed to a racist system, which not only exposes them to unspeakable violence, but also criminalization. In 2018, Black children still need protection. Through the life of Trayvon Martin and others, community members and organizers are standing up for the basic rights of Black children to ensure they make it through each phase of their childhood – and exercise their right to be children.

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Gentrification = genocide!

Land and housing is a humane right for All; not a privilege and a way to reap more profits for the monied interests! As WE see it, these latest efforts to “re-develop” and “gentrify” our cities – from San Francisco to Oakland, Harlem to Chicago and beyond – are a continuation of the centuries-long horrific wars of mass genocide perpetrated by European capitalism, European (white) nationalism and the false doctrines of European (white) “superiority” and racist terrorism.

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So ... Marvel finally made ya’ll love Africa?

Shanequa Jenkins never wanted nothin’ to do with Africa. When her roommates would demand that she turn off “Love and Hip Hop” so they could watch “Hidden Colors,” she would just storm out the room calling them “Hotep Hoes” under her breath. So, it shocked her roomies when two hours before the “Black Panther” premier she was waiting at the front door in a brand new dashiki with matching Red Bottoms and Coach Bag yellin’, “Y’all ain’t ready to go, yet!?”

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